Greed Vs Green

Leo F. Saldanha, the coordinator of the non-profit Environment Support Group, which has been litigating for lake preservation for over two decades, says,
“All these were natural agricultural wetlands. But while putting up buildings, planners should have ensured space for water to collect and interlinkages to lakes downstream if they overflowed. It was a very simple thing to do, but we ignored it and the citizens are paying the price—as we all experienced in the recent floods.”

Read more

Concrete Galore: The Transformation Of Bengaluru

The concretising didn’t stop with roads; like a cancer it spread across to pavements, as paved regions into parks, and even into urban forests like Turahalli where, thankfully, public resistance stopped it. But the phenomenon is so widespread now, that it shows up in satellite imageries, and when it rains, the city floods in no time as there is simply no open ground for water to percolate. And in summer ‘heat islands’ result, desiccating what little greenery is left.

Read more

Why Did Bengaluru Get Badly Flooded? | Express Dialogues

Bengaluru witnessed torrential rains and floods that created a disastrous impact. As a result, a large part of #Bengaluru was underwater.
The New Indian Express spoke to experts to understand the cause and effect of this concerning issue.Experts go on to state that rapid construction, encroachment, and corruption are behind the crisis.

Read more

All Saints Church – Sacred Living Heritage Of Bengaluru – Saved For Posterity

At a time when the meeting of minds is so very rare, this effort by the All Saints Church congregation, BMRCL, Government of Karnataka, and various supporters of the cause, including ESG, stands out as representative of the enormous possibilities of democratic engagement. The conciliation mechanism organised by EIB helped in this process. This also helped ensure that the contestations did not end up in Court, burdening further the judiciary, and without a clear outcome in sight.

Read more

Environment Justice Matters Vol 3. Issue. 6 | Large Gaps In Bengaluru’s Urban Planning Process & More

The IPCC sixth assessment report released early April notes that climate misinformation can jeopardise climate action  and weaken public demand for mitigation and adaptation measures. The  report  acknowledges the role of misinformation in fuelling polarisation, saying, “Together with the proliferation of suspicions of “fake news” and “post-truth”, some traditional and social media contents have fuelled polarisation and partisan divides on climate change in many countries.”

Read more

Webinar Report: Consolidating Visions For Bengaluru’s Climate Action Plan

Week 9 of “Bengaluru’s Climate Action Plan: Making it Participatory and Inclusive”An initiative of Environment Support Group, Bengaluru Background Earlier this year, Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike (BBMP) voluntarily committed that the metropolis of Bengaluru would take steps to achieve the targets of the Paris Climate Agreement: i.e., to take local action that would help the world contain global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels.  On the occasion of the 2021 World

Read more

Week 8: Reimagining Bengaluru’s Infrastructure As Resilient To Climate-Change

The ‘smart city’ projects have skewed relationships between intent and impact, with massive investments being made in gentrified neighborhoods to the neglect of most other areas of the metropolis. Meanwhile, investments in essential social, education and health infrastructure remain stagnant and are even declining. Would turning planning and development into deeply democratic and decentralised processes and promoting self-sufficient neighborhoods be the answer to reducing the carbon footprint of the metropolis and adapting Bengaluru to climate change impacts?

Read more

Webinar Report: Securing Clean Air And Inclusive Mobility For Bengaluru

“Environmental justice, transportation justice, street justice are all deeply political matters, and to see it merely from a technical perspective will not give us the answers…It is also important to try and create a network where it doesn’t become a government-driven system alone. As consumers we have power. As consumers, we are not effectively networked to propel the transformation that is essential”

Read more

Your Participation Can Make Bengaluru’s Climate Action Plan More Inclusive

Thank you to those of you who have joined us in the ongoing webinar series “Bengaluru’s Climate Action: Making it Participatory and Inclusive“. If you are yet to register for the series, you can do so here.Bengaluru’s people have always been active and conscious about their natural right to participate in decision making about their city and its future. The webinar series is yet another instance of that. We are excited to be involved in catalysing a constructive dialogue process for namma ooru to evolve

Read more

Week 7: Securing Clean Air And Inclusive Mobility For Bengaluru

Everyone pays a very high price for mobility in Bengaluru. Incredible traffic snarls cost precious time, money, infrastructure and public health, and substantially erode the ‘salubrious’ quality of the metropolis. With an astonishing 0.8 to 1 vehicle to population ratio, Bengaluru metropolitan area is amongst the most fossil fuel dependent urban spaces globally. Air quality is significantly deteriorating, resulting in severe health impacts, especially for the poor and marginalised.

Read more

Webinar Report: Making Bengaluru Energy Independent

“Is it possible to keep this city running with this pattern of consumption and demand for energy? How are BESCOM and KPTCL sustaining this supply? What are the challenges of the petrochemical sector in supporting fuel demands? Is there a way that we could shift to more sustainable sources, such as renewable energy, and can those transitions be just for all involved? Will such just transitions require Bangalore Metropolitan Planning Authorities to imagine futures that are based on sustainable energy systems, in contrast with the prevailing extractive and unsustainable systems? And can we ensure all homes (be they of rich, poor or middle classes), institutions, offices, government buildings will find ways to consume less power and shift to alternate forms of locally generated power?”

Read more

Week 6: Making Bengaluru Energy Independent

Date: 26th April 2021, Monday, 6:00 PM India on Zoom Pls note: Registration is not required if you have already enrolled for the webinar series. Overview As India aims to transition away from fossil fuels with ambitious plans to invest in renewable energy, especially in solar power, massive tracts of farmland and commons are being converted into mega solar parks. Would it be possible to imagine a metropolis that can produce its own energy, at

Read more

Week 5 Webinar Report: Securing Biodiversity Rich, Healthy, Socially Inclusive And Economically Viable Commons In Bengaluru

“Commons bring people of the city together. It gives an opportunity to mix people from various communities…In a public park you will find people from a diverse set of communities; people from across caste and class economic status and so on and that is important for us to broaden our minds also. Otherwise we are just limited and living in our own silos”

Read more

Week 5: Securing Biodiversity Rich, Healthy, Socially Inclusiveand Economically Viable Commons In Bengaluru

Densely crowded, polluted, non-inclusive and stress-inducing concretised spaces are making neighbourhoods increasingly vulnerable to various impacts of climate change such as flooding and the ‘heat island’ effect. How, into the future, can the metropolis secure biodiversity rich, healthy and economically viable spaces for all?

Read more

Webinar Report: Making Bengaluru Water Secure

Download Report 8 April 2021 Week 3 of “Bengaluru’s Climate Action Plan: Making it Participatory and  Inclusive” Recording Overview In January, the then commissioner of the Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike  (BBMP), Mr. N Manjunatha Prasad, IAS wrote to Mayor Eric Garcetti of Los Angeles,  the Chair of ‘C-40 Cities’, voluntarily committing the metropolis of Bengaluru to take  steps to achieve the targets of the Paris Climate Agreement: i.e., to take local action  that would help

Read more
Skip to content